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  • Connected cars are here – and they’re at risk of being hacked
  • Connected cars are here – and they’re at risk of being hacked
    Héctor García (2014) ©
REPORT

How car-hacking will change the way we drive

To many, car-hacking sounds like an improbable danger from a distant future. But many new cars are connected to wireless networks, and are already vulnerable. Hacking is responsible for a third of car thefts in the UK. Is digital security now the car industry’s biggest challenge?

Location North America / Northern Europe

Scope
To many people, car-hacking sounds like an improbable danger from a distant future. In an E-Marketer survey, 56% of American car owners had heard of connected cars, but only 14% knew what they were. [1] But though people might not realise it, many new cars are connected to wireless digital networks, and are already vulnerable to hacking. The Institute of Engineering and Technology’s Martyn Thomas reveals that, for years, car dealerships have been able to wirelessly unlock vehicles, in case owners misplace their keys – and it’s through systems like this that criminals have been able ...

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