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  • People want to consume media as and when they like
  • People want to consume media as and when they like
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CASE STUDY

HideMyAss!: bootlegging Netflix in Australia

Netflix has 50 million subscribers, and it's offered in over 50 countries – but Australia isn’t one of them. So what do Australians do when they want to stream a movie? They do exactly the same as the rest of us, and watch Netflix – only they do it illegally.

Location Oceania / Global

Scope
Netflix has 50 million subscribers worldwide, and is currently offered in over 50 countries worldwide – but it isn’t available in Australia. [1][2] So what do Australians do when they want to stream a movie online? They do exactly the same as the rest of us, and watch Netflix – only they do it illegally. A new report suggests potentially 200,000 people are unlawfully using Netflix and other streaming sites. [3]

People in Australia, and other countries that are outside of Netflix's current reach, are able to sign up ...

Canvas8

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