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  • Can smart bike-sharing schemes create the city of the future?
  • Can smart bike-sharing schemes create the city of the future?
    Gobike (2014) ©
CASE STUDY

Gobike: smart cycling in Copenhagen

Around half a million bikes are sold in Denmark each year, and nine out of ten Danes own one. It's the ideal location for high-tech smart bike-sharing scheme Gobike to debut. But what will it mean for locals? And can it provide an effective solution to travel in other cities?

Location Denmark

Scope
If bicycle heaven existed, it would probably be in Denmark. Around half a million bikes are sold in the country annually, and nine out of ten Danes own one. [1] So it’s not surprising that the decision to scrap Copenhagen’s 17-year-old bike sharing scheme in favour of a high-tech one was not taken lightly. What will this new system mean for Danish locals? And can it provide an effective and efficient long-term solution to travel in other cities?

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