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  • In an age when most people have cameras, it’s easy to broadcast yourself
  • In an age when most people have cameras, it’s easy to broadcast yourself
    Lotus Carroll, Creative Commons (2011) ©
REPORT

Why teens would rather be internet famous

One in three teens claim they could make money by creating YouTube videos. The success of social media stars like Bethany Mota shows that celebrity endorsements aren't influential as they used to be. Today's teens want inspiration from cool kids who could easily be their mates.

Location North America / Northern Europe / Global

Scope
36% of teens aged 13-17 claimed that if they tried, they could make money by making YouTube videos. The success of social media stars like Bethany Mota and Nash Grier shows that celebrity endorsements aren't influential as they used to be. Instead, today’s teens are looking for inspiration from the Tumblr and Instagram famous; average kids who have become internet sensations for their great taste and ingenious creativity. These savvy youth may be considered micro-celebrities, but there is nothing tiny about their influence or their aspirations.

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