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  • Would you be more likely to read print news if you’d collated it yourself?
  • Would you be more likely to read print news if you’d collated it yourself?
    PaperLater (2014) ©
CASE STUDY

PaperLater: a personalised paper to read at your leisure

In an average day over 92,000 articles are posted online - the sheer volume of content is just unmanageable and impossible to consume. Combating this, UK-based PaperLater lets you save articles from the web, and in three days a customised printed paper is delivered to your door.

Location United Kingdom

Scope
In an average day over 92,000 articles are posted online. From news scoops to sports stories, the sheer volume of content is just unmanageable and impossible to consume. [1] As we peruse around the web, we encounter countless articles that are just too long to read while getting from A to B, or just too exhausting to read on your lunch break. And as we add more and more links to our bookmarks folder, it becomes a vast graveyard of unread content.

The Newspaper Club aims to change this with its new project PaperLater. The ...

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