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  • Can your phone really help you change your spending habits?
  • Can your phone really help you change your spending habits?
    Matthew Kenwrick, Creative Commons (2011) ©
CASE STUDY

PhotoMoney: snap your spending in Japan

Studies show that three quarters of us are born with the inclination to make poor spending decisions - spurring the creation of Japanese money management app PhotoMoney. And while it's not the first, developers believe it's unique enough to effectively alter spending habits.

Location Japan

Scope
"Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." [1] Comedian Will Rogers may have made this famous revelation as part of a sketch, but actually, many people are genetically pre-disposed to be bad with money. Studies show that a full three quarters of people are born with the inclination to make poor spending decisions. [2]

And it's this universally relatable bad habit that has spurred the creation of Japanese money management app PhotoMoney. While it's joining endless ranks of self-help ...

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