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  • Have today’s digital native kids forgotten how to play outside?
  • Have today’s digital native kids forgotten how to play outside?
    David Baker, Creative Commons (2009) ©
CASE STUDY

LeapBand: do we have to track our children’s play?

Toy maker LeapFrog has created a watered down version of what every adult seems to be playing with today – a fitness tracker. Called the LeapBand, it motivates kids to jump around and be more active. But do parents really need to be tracking their kids while they play?

Location North America / Northern Europe

Scope
Young kids love to copy their mums and dads. They drive toy cars, speak into plastic phones and push tiny prams around the house. And as technology seeps into everyday life, they want to get their hands on the devices that their parents use, too. Responding to this sentiment, toy maker LeapFrog has created a watered down version of what every adult seems to be playing with today – a fitness tracker. Called the LeapBand, it motivates kids to jump around and be more active. But do parents really need to be tracking their kids while they play?

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