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  • Everyone’s body is different, so why do we all take the same medicine?
  • Everyone’s body is different, so why do we all take the same medicine?
    Mislav Marohnić, Creative Commons (2010) ©
CASE STUDY

Electronic skin patch: painkillers tailored to you

In a world where products and clothes are designed to fit every body shape and size, why does medicine still use ‘one size fits all’? Is wearable technology finally advancing to provide a more bespoke healthcare service and more personalised medicine?

Location North America / Central - East Asia

Scope
It’s Monday morning and you’ve got a headache. The first thing you do is reach for the paracetamol. Checking the back of the packet, you can see that you are advised to take two capsules up to four times a day as required. But in a world where products and clothes are designed to fit every body shape and size, why does medicine still use ‘one size fits all’? Is technology finally advancing to provide a more bespoke healthcare service and more personalised medicine?

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Canvas8

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