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  • People are looking for unique, immersive experiences over products
  • People are looking for unique, immersive experiences over products
    Sensory Fiction (2014) ©
CASE STUDY

Sensory Fiction: getting lost in a book

Reading is an emotional experience. Books can make you laugh, cry or feel scared - but can technology make them even more immersive? MIT's Media Lab has created a book that lets you really feel and experience first-hand the emotions and environments described in the text.

Location United States

Scope
Reading is an emotional experience. Books can make you laugh, cry or feel terrified; they are an immersive medium. But until now, it’s been purely imaginary. Researchers at MIT’s Media Lab have attempted to take the immersive experience of reading a book firmly into the 21st century. [1] They’ve created a book that allows readers to really feel and experience first-hand the emotions and environments described in the text. Sensory Fiction is adding a whole new dimension to the reading experience.

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